FAQ - Are Recruiting Services Really Needed? A Look into College Track and Field Recruiting

Track and Field Recruiting

  Frequently Asked Questions –   Does my son or daughter really need a recruiting service to get recruited - probably not. Most likely, all they really need to do is run fast or jump high or throw really far. If they do not hit a particular mark then all they probably have to do is to initiate contact with enough college coaches to garner some interest. In fact, during the span of my 25 year coaching career at the NCAA I level, I was shocked by the price tag of such recruiting services when compared to the end result. Most recruiting services hire staff members with little expertise and actual experience in the sport they are representing. So, as a result the end product is typically little more than some generic finger-pointing in the right direction and a fancy online profile for college coaches to peruse, if so desired.  On the surface, the recruiting process seems simple enough. In fact, on the surface running or throwing or jumping seems simple enough, very simple. In fact, our species has been doing it for years. Seemingly all one needs to do is buy Jack Daniel’s Running Formula and voila  - you are on the road to greatness. How hard is it, right? Do a little research and workout. Anyone can do it.  However, to run faster or faster longer or to jump or throw further or to vault higher, one would certainly benefit from a knowledgeable coach. Does my son or daughter really need a coach to run fast? No, not if they are naturally fast. But, they do need a knowledgeable coach to run faster. That is what we do. Are we needed – probably not? Many, many high school student-athletes are recruited annually without using a recruiting service – just as many, many 100m runners run fast without adequate preparation or training. However, if you want to run faster…if you want to get into a school one rung higher than you initially anticipated, if you want to get more scholarship money than you thought possible, and if you want to be exposed to programs and colleges that would be great fits for you based on real information gathered through the collection of data, years of coaching experience and knowledge of over a time thirty year period of time that is where we come in. We can help you maximize financial aid packaging. We can help you identify schools and programs not currently on your radar. We can provide program information with regard to attrition rates, injuries, program burn-out, coaching changes, facility limitations and such.  And, from a cost analysis is it worth it? Though the total cost can appear daunting at first the cost of a recruiting service pales in comparison to future educational costs. Most of you will be paying somewhere between $100,000 - $700,000 – recruiting service costs will range from 0.002 – 0.9% of that amount and will be almost certainly be absorbed by added financial aid or scholarship dollars.  Are we needed,  no. Will we make your experience better, YES!  Will you end up with more and better choices and more lucrative offers, YES!  For more information for parents regarding their role in the recruiting process see here -  https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/inside-the-huddle/2018/5/29/three-things-track-and-field-athletes-should-understand-going-into-the-recruiting-process   For more information on what the prospective student-athlete should be doing see here -  https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/inside-the-huddle/2018/6/10/three-things-track-and-field-recruits-should-understand-about-college-track-and-field-recruiting

Frequently Asked Questions –

Does my son or daughter really need a recruiting service to get recruited - probably not. Most likely, all they really need to do is run fast or jump high or throw really far. If they do not hit a particular mark then all they probably have to do is to initiate contact with enough college coaches to garner some interest. In fact, during the span of my 25 year coaching career at the NCAA I level, I was shocked by the price tag of such recruiting services when compared to the end result. Most recruiting services hire staff members with little expertise and actual experience in the sport they are representing. So, as a result the end product is typically little more than some generic finger-pointing in the right direction and a fancy online profile for college coaches to peruse, if so desired.

On the surface, the recruiting process seems simple enough. In fact, on the surface running or throwing or jumping seems simple enough, very simple. In fact, our species has been doing it for years. Seemingly all one needs to do is buy Jack Daniel’s Running Formula and voila  - you are on the road to greatness. How hard is it, right? Do a little research and workout. Anyone can do it.

However, to run faster or faster longer or to jump or throw further or to vault higher, one would certainly benefit from a knowledgeable coach. Does my son or daughter really need a coach to run fast? No, not if they are naturally fast. But, they do need a knowledgeable coach to run faster. That is what we do. Are we needed – probably not? Many, many high school student-athletes are recruited annually without using a recruiting service – just as many, many 100m runners run fast without adequate preparation or training. However, if you want to run faster…if you want to get into a school one rung higher than you initially anticipated, if you want to get more scholarship money than you thought possible, and if you want to be exposed to programs and colleges that would be great fits for you based on real information gathered through the collection of data, years of coaching experience and knowledge of over a time thirty year period of time that is where we come in. We can help you maximize financial aid packaging. We can help you identify schools and programs not currently on your radar. We can provide program information with regard to attrition rates, injuries, program burn-out, coaching changes, facility limitations and such.

And, from a cost analysis is it worth it? Though the total cost can appear daunting at first the cost of a recruiting service pales in comparison to future educational costs. Most of you will be paying somewhere between $100,000 - $700,000 – recruiting service costs will range from 0.002 – 0.9% of that amount and will be almost certainly be absorbed by added financial aid or scholarship dollars.

Are we needed,  no. Will we make your experience better, YES!  Will you end up with more and better choices and more lucrative offers, YES!

For more information for parents regarding their role in the recruiting process see here - https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/inside-the-huddle/2018/5/29/three-things-track-and-field-athletes-should-understand-going-into-the-recruiting-process

For more information on what the prospective student-athlete should be doing see here - https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/inside-the-huddle/2018/6/10/three-things-track-and-field-recruits-should-understand-about-college-track-and-field-recruiting

Am I Fast Enough To Run At Wake Forest University- College Track and Field Recruiting

Understanding How College Track and Field Recruiting Standards Are Determined

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Hey, Coach – I am very interested in running at Wake Forest…am I fast enough? I have received numerous e-mails about running at Wake Forest over the past few weeks. So I thought I would provide information on their recruiting standards.

In a conversation with a very high-end NCAA I Head Coach this morning, we discussed how recruiting standards are created. I believe that most programs develop recruiting standards in the same manner. Coaches are looking for athletes who have the potential to score points at the conference level. I did the very same thing while at Columbia. This differs a great deal from the typical high school track program philosophy. College programs are not looking to simply cover all of the events. As the coach this morning indicated, “I wish that recruits and their parents understood that our standards are based on conference results – not whether we have someone better in that event.”

For example, let me go back to Wake Forest. Their top 200m runner ran 21.85 this past spring. Their second best 200m runner ran 22.36. So, one would presume if I were a 22.0 200m runner who was a junior in high school that I could run at Wake Forest. However, there is much more to it. The ACC is comprised of 15 schools – many of which a great sprint programs. A quick review of their conference list (https://www.tfrrs.org/lists/2250.html ) revels that 20 men  have run faster than 21.30 and 50 men ran faster than 21.85 – the ACC only scores 8 places – do the math.

For more information on recruiting standards click here -

For more information on Wake Forest University Track and Field click here. 

 

Always Do This When E-Mailing A College Coach

College Track and Field Recruiting

 Carefully proofread every email before hitting send. I cannot tell you how many emails I received from recruits specifically addressed to a rival coach expressing their interest in that rival school. A great deal of communication in the early phases of the recruiting process is going to be cut and paste on both sides, however, making a simple mistake can dehumanize the process and render the remainder of your communication less credible. It may also be helpful to send a couple of test emails to yourself first to ensure that the font or text sizes have not changed where you have cut and pasted new names.

Carefully proofread every email before hitting send. I cannot tell you how many emails I received from recruits specifically addressed to a rival coach expressing their interest in that rival school. A great deal of communication in the early phases of the recruiting process is going to be cut and paste on both sides, however, making a simple mistake can dehumanize the process and render the remainder of your communication less credible. It may also be helpful to send a couple of test emails to yourself first to ensure that the font or text sizes have not changed where you have cut and pasted new names.

AM I FAST ENOUGH - TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING STANDARDS

TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING STANDARDS

TRACK AND FIELD SCHOLARSHIPS

Want to know what you need to run, jump or throw to get the attention of the schools of your dreams? I have provided links to numerous schools below. Most indicate what performance they require from you to either walk-on or gain an athletic scholarship.

I would caution you to take this information with a gigantic grain of salt. Many program’s list of published standards is more their dream wish list as opposed to their actual line in the sand list. Numerous programs list rather stringent walk-on standards, but a simply quick perusal of their teams performances at www.tfrrs.org will clearly show that many athletes in their program (regardless of year in college) are incapable of hitting the listed walk-on standard expected of high school athletes.

My point – don’t be discouraged if you don’t hit their published marks – just keep improving and striving toward that mark. Use the recruiting process to sell yourself effectively! However, if you are not anywhere near their walk-on times, you may want to consider other options.

MIT Track and Field Recruiting Standards

University of Alabama Recruiting Standards:

Harvard Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

University of Michigan Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Columbia University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

University of Miami Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Purdue University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Western Carolina University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

University of North Carolina Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Liberty University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Cal-Berkely Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

Auburn University Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

University of Iowa Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

Loyola University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Dartmouth Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

Penn Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

Fast Track Recruiting Ivy League Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Want To Be A Big 10 Sprinter - College Track and Field Recruiting Standards

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING

College Track and Field Scholarships

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I was recently asked what time would be required to compete in the sprints/hurdles at a Big 10 school. Obviously, there is no conference standard to be able to walk-on at a member institution or a generic scholarship list of standards as it varies from school to school. However, I did reach out to one of the more successful programs in the Big 10 and was able to get their recruiting standards.   It is also important to keep in mind that consistent performances at the indicated levels along with the ability to contribute competitively in other events will be used to award athletic scholarships.  These marks are the minimum standards to receive an athletic scholarship.  Remember, in Track and Field a scholarship can range from books to a full-ride. If you just barely achieve the mark below, you should not expect more than books - 20%. Want to know if you can compete in the Big Ten, see below:

WALK-ON STANDARDS, Men / Women

100m- 10.80 / 12.10

200m- 21.70 / 24.90

400m- 48.50 / 56.50

110HH- 14.50 / 14.40

300IH- 38.10 / 44.50

400IH- 53.50 / 62.50

SCHOLARSHIP STANDARDS,  Men / Women

100m-  10.60 / 11.90

200m- 21.50 / 24.55

400m- 47.90 / 55.00

110HH- 14.00 / 13.80

300IH- 37.90 / 43.60

400IH- 52.50 / 61.50

Three Reasons Why To Consider A Public Ivy – College Track and Field Recruiting

College Track and Field Recruiting

Public Ivy League Schools

track and field scholarships

 

 

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Are you an Ivy League type-student? If so, when considering where to attend college and compete athletically, most of you will be encouraged to pursue Ivy League institutions or other notable high-end private academic universities such as Duke, Stanford, MIT, and John’s Hopkins. 

However, as you begin to create a list of potential schools and programs, you may want to consider casting your net a bit wider. Are there any public schools out there that can match the caliber of top private schools? Yes, and here are three reasons to consider “Public Ivy League” schools:

1. Affordability

Public Ivy schools are potentially significantly more cost-effective based on your family’s financial situation. According to Laura Staffaroni of PrepScholars, the median price for tuition of the top Public Ivy Schools is under $14,000/year for in-state students.

Additionally, not only do “Public Ivies” have some of the most competitive cross country and track and field programs in the nation, they also give out athletic scholarships and while this is true for some top private schools such as Stanford and Duke it is not the case for any Ivy League colleges or NCAA III institutions like MIT and Chicago.

2. Acceptance Rates

Although, “Public Ivy League” schools are still difficult to get into there is no doubt that top-tier private schools and Ivy League universities are significantly more selective. Average acceptance rates at the nation’s top five private schools are approximately 6-7% compared to an acceptance rate of around 25%at the top 5 public universities.

 

3. Enrollment Size

Are you looking for more of a big school feel or experience? According to Laura Stafforoni, the median undergraduate population for an Ivy League institution is around 6,400 students, while for a Public Ivy it's closer to 25,000 students.

If you want to apply to an academically rigorous, fairly selective, and well-known public school, you should absolutely consider applying to a Public Ivy. It makes great financial sense to apply to a Public Ivy in your state, and while Public Ivies can get more expensive for out-of-state students, they're still usually cheaper than a private college or university.

Here is a brief list of schools/programs you may want to consider as you are compiling your list:

Most Selective Academically and Competitive Athletically: UCLA, University of Virginia, University of North Carolina, Michigan, UC-Berkley

Other of Note: William & Mary, Georgia Tech, Wisconsin, Vermont, Washington, Florida, Penn State, Ohio State, Illinois, Purdue, and Texas.

For further information on Public Ivies see: https://blog.prepscholar.com/public-ivy-league-schools

I Am A Senior - Is It Too Late For Me?

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING

 

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Last year, at this exact time, we were fortunate to sign up Quinest Bishop from Rock Hill SC. He had just completed his Senior year and was still looking for somewhere to go to school and run track. Quinest was a  good student and accomplished runner an I was excited to assist him. Within two weeks, Quinest signed a National Letter of Intent with NCAA I Troy University. 

Quinest has had an amazing first year at Troy running 10.60 (100m) and 21.72 (200m) in his first collegiate season of competition. 

https://www.directathletics.com/athletes/track/6541620.html

Virtual Campus Tour: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcG4hC9KE2Q

It was nit too late for Quinest last year and it is not tool ate for you this year. There is still time to find a great fit for you! 

 

I Just Finished My Sophomore Year, Now What?

College Track and Field Recruiting

College athletic recruiting

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I recently received an e-mail from a mother of a high school runner who has just completed their sophomore year of high school. She was curious as to how the recruiting process and timeline have been altered by last year’s NCAA rule change allowing coaches to speak with current juniors.

You are now already halfway through high school and will be heading off to college in two years. And, for a good number of you – you will be making your college decision in the Fall of 2019. Typically, I would have not offered this advice so early on in the process, but with the changes in the recruiting calendar you should make the appropriate changes.

Cast a wide net - See what's out there and determine what type of school might be a good fit for you. If you have not yet done so create an expansive list of schools/programs that meet your specific needs and desires.

Fill out online recruiting questionnaires - The online recruiting questionnaire is a good first step and simple means to initiate communication with a program. It allows the coach to assess if you are a good fit for their program and alerts them to your internest in their program,. 

Contact college coaches - If you have not yet started -- start reaching out to college coaches from the schools on your list. You will be surprised at how effective personally reaching out to coaches will enhance your recruiting experience.   

Take the ACT / SAT - Register and take the SAT/ACT during your junior year. If you feel adequately prepared, I would suggest taking the test in the fall of your junior year. This will allow you plenty of time to take it for the second time in the spring. If you are considering attending a highly selective academic institution taking the test earlier will significantly enhance your recruitment. Most selective schools will not vigorously pursue a potential-student athlete without test scores to determine admissibility.

Utilize Unofficial Visits - Unofficial visits can help you gather significant information about individual programs and schools. This time will allow you an opportunity to meet the coach inperson, tour the college, check out the athletic facilities, and possibly meet current team members.

In summary, do not be passive -- start reaching out to college coaches now. E-mail every program that you are interested in, regardless of the perceived reach. Be your own greatest advocate and take charge of your future. 

College Track and Field Recruiting Do's and Dont's

College Track and Field Recruiting

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College Track and Field Recruiting

DO NOT approach this process passively. Be aggressive in your outreach and email every program that you are interested in, regardless of the perceived reach. It is up to you to not only create a compelling story but also be able to tell it. Be your own greatest advocate and take charge of your future. Consider this one of the most important competitions of your high school career and prepare accordingly! The recruiting process can be daunting. There are so many unknowns, however, if you get started early, put in the work, and take an active role you will find the right fit.

For more recruiting tips click here - https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/inside-the-huddle/2018/1/24/recruiting-advice-for-current-juniors        

Further recruiting information may be found here - http://www.milesplit.com/articles/214461/three-things-athletes-must-understand-going-into-the-recruiting-process

College Track and Field Recruiting Do's and Don'ts

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING

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DO your homework! You should have a keen understanding of the unique strengths of each program. It will go along way with the coaching staff if it appears you know a great deal about their specific school and team. Have a solid understanding of where they rank athletically and academically, what their unique strengths are and how they compare to the other schools you are considering. On occasion, I would literally have prospects in my office tell me that they were really interested in State U or Academic U, but they knew they could not get into that school or run for their team. It would dumbfound me as we had a lower acceptance rate and were significantly better athletically. Know who and where you are visiting.

To see how you stack up athletically against their current runners check out current performance lists at  https://tfrrs.org/ 

To see where they rank academically check out https://www.usnews.com/best-colleges

For more recruiting information click here - https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/athletic-recruiting-blog/2018/1/24/recruiting-advice-for-current-juniors

Seniors - It Is Not Too Late, Step One

College Track and Field Recruiting

By: Willy Wood

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The regular signing date is still two months away. It is not too late for you to find the right college and program. In fact, many schools will have scholarship money and/or roster spots available well into the summer. At this point in the process, I suggest reaching out to schools that have reached out to you.  Go through your old emails, letters of inquiry, questionnaires, and generic correspondences, and then create a list of every school that has contacted you. Reach out to these programs and start a dialogue if you haven't yet. You may be pleasantly surprised and find a good fit for you at a place you are not currently considering. Concentrate your efforts on programs that have shown an interest in you.

For more information on how to best navigate the recruiting process check out - https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/inside-the-huddle/2017/7/14/the-dos-and-dont-of-recruiting

Recruiting Advice For Current Juniors

College Track and Field Recruiting

By - Willy Wood

You are already halfway through your junior year of high school and will be heading off to college in eight months. Many programs have completed their recruiting classes for this year and are now focusing their efforts on next year's class -- this year's juniors. As it is now permissible for college coaches to call juniors, the recruiting process has already begun. To ensure that you take full advantage of this process, here are a few suggestions to help you find the right fit for you.

 

1. Cast A Wide Net

Your junior year is about seeing what's out there and what kind of school might be a good fit for you. If you have not yet done so create an expansive list of schools/programs that meet your specific needs and desires. Among factors to consider are affiliation (NCAA I, II, III, NAIA and JUCO), competitiveness of the program, cost of attendance, quality of education, geographical location, intended academic major, enrollment size, public vs private, and other factors that matter to you.  

 

Think about what may impact your athletic experience the most like coaching style, athlete retention, and success of the program. Determine if you are a good fit athletically -- many schools post their recruiting standards online.  

 

Know what the academic requirements are for the schools you are considering to determine if you are potentially admissible.  

 

Continually revise your list. During my coaching career, I often saw recruits close doors too early. They would rule out programs in their junior year of high school based on a variety of factors and then end up scrambling in the end when Plan A did not work out. Make sure to keep Plan B in play as to not have to settle for Plan C at the last minute.

 

2. Fill Out Online Recruiting Questionnaires

The online recruiting questionnaire is a good first and simple means to initiate communication with a program. It allows the coach to assess if you are a good fit for their program. In a recent interview with the Recruiting Code, Duke University head women's cross country coach Rhonda Riley was asked, "What are the important steps for an athlete to get noticed by you?" She responded, "The two ways to get on my radar are to fill out our online questionnaire and to follow up with an email. When a high school athlete takes the time to send an email with their contact information, personal best marks, academic information etc. it means they are serious about considering Duke as a potential university." Online recruiting questionnaires are typically very easy to find on individual schools' track and field websites.

 

3. Contact College Coaches

Over the span of my 30-year coaching career, I learned that communication is the most important element to reaching your goals. If you have not yet started -- start reaching out to college coaches from the schools on your list. You will be surprised at how effective personally reaching out to coaches will enhance your recruiting experience.  

 

Proofread every email before hitting send. A great deal of communication in the early phases of the recruiting process is going to be cut and paste on both sides, however, making a simple mistake can dehumanize the process and render the remainder of your communication less credible. Make sure you are addressing the proper institution and coach. I cannot tell you how many emails I received from recruits specifically addressed to a rival coach expressing their interest in a rival school.  

 

Send updates on a regular basis.  Most coaches receive dozens of emails from recruits each day so it's important that you keep yourself on their radar.

 

4. Take The ACT / SAT

Register and take the SAT/ACT during your junior year. If you feel adequately prepared, I would suggest taking the test in the fall of your junior year. This will allow you plenty of time to take it for the second time in the spring. Everyone's test prep is going to vary based on their own strengths, weaknesses, schedule, and goals. At the very minimum, though, all students should try to put in 10 hours of focused test prep, at least to get familiar with the format and timing of the test. Realistically, you would need to put in much more time over a sustained period to do well.

 

However, if you are not ready to take the test do not view it as a test-run. Do not take the test until you have prepared to do so at a level that is reflective of your academic potential.

 

If you are considering attending a highly selective academic institution taking the test earlier will significantly enhance your recruitment. Most selective schools will not vigorously pursue a potential-student athlete without test scores to determine admissibility.

 

5. Utilize Unofficial Visits

Unofficial visits can help you gather significant information about individual programs and schools. This time will allow you an opportunity to meet the coach in person, tour the college, check out the athletic facilities, and possibly meet current team members.

 

Do your homework - know who and where you are visiting. Have a keen understanding of the unique strengths of each school and team, as it will show the respective coaching staff how serious you are about their program. Use this time to learn as much as you can about the program and coaching staff. Identify the factors that will be most important to you in determining if you will return for an official visit. Have a short list of specific questions ready that address the most critical factors in your college decision.

 

There is no imposed limit on the number of unofficial visits you may take, so take as many as possible. There is no better tool to help you hone in on the best school/program for you.

In summary:  

Your junior year is quickly passing and it is time to start seriously considering where you want to continue your academic and athletic pursuits. Do not be passive -- start reaching out to college coaches now. Be aggressive in your outreach and email every program that you are interested in, regardless of the perceived reach. Be your own greatest advocate and take charge of your future.

Determine The Best Fit For You

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING

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During your freshmen and sophomore years create an expansive list of schools/programs that meet your specific needs and desires.  Among factors to consider are affiliation level (NCAA I, II, III, NAIA and JUCO), competitiveness of the program, cost of attendance, quality of education, geographical location, intended academic major, enrollment size, public vs private, and other factors that matter to YOU.

Do not be mesmerized by the name of a school. See beyond the prowess of their football and basketball programs or their academic reputation. Make sure the school you choose meets your needs for reasons beyond it simply being cool to tell the world you will be running or studying at a particular school. Remember, you have to live, study, train and compete there every day for four years.

Many brilliant scholars and successful professionals have attended state schools with less than brilliant academic reputations. Additionally, many NCAA mid-major athletes have claimed national championships on the team and individual level.

In fact, at this year's NCAA National Outdoor Track & Field Championships nearly 33% of the participants represented non-Power 5 schools - three were crowned NCAA National Champion and an additional 14 scored for their teams by placing in the top eight. Furthermore, two-time US Olympian and World Championships silver medalist, Nick Symmonds competed at the NCAA Division 3 level while in college.

Plain and simple, choose a school that you would be happy at without track and field - just in case your athletic career does not go as planned.

Empower Your Child - College Track and Field Recruiting

College Track and Field Recruiting

Advice to Parents

Empower Your Child

 

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As a parent, there are many things you can do to help your child navigate the recruiting process. Among the very most important things you can do is to empower them!. 

As a coach, one of the biggest red flags our staff identified during the early stages of the recruiting process was overly involved parents. I cannot enumerate the number of times our staff uttered a comment such as "Can we truly trust this person in the heat of battle if their parents do everything for them?" It is imperative that you have your child initiate all communication throughout the recruiting process. I would suggest strict adherence to the following areas:

Do not send e-mails on their behalf. It lessens their viability. As a coach, I received far too many, "I know they are my son/daughter, but they are truly amazing" letters and e-mails.

Make them speak even when they do not want to. They should answer the phone and ask the questions. You are not a screening service. If the coach is not important enough for you to speak with, eliminate that school from your shortlist.

Let them shine. On official, or unofficial, visits take a backseat to your child. Let them read from the list of questions you created together. Avoid speaking on their behalf or interjecting to clarify for them. Walk a couple of steps behind when touring the campus so they may converse directly to the coach or student host.

YEAR IN REVIEW - 2017

Although, we did not open for business until June of this past year, we have had great successes along the way. Here are just a few of our 2017 highlights:

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FAST TRACK RECRUITING - Open for business, June 2017

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Quinest Bishop

signs NLI with TROY UNIVERSITY, June 2017.

Our only Class of 2017 team member

FAST TRACK RECRUITING

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MALLORY BARNES

Class of 2018 - DARTMOUTH COLLEGE

Official visit to YALE UNIVERSITY

FAST TRACK RECRUITING

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BEN BAYLESS

Class of 2018

SCHOOL RECORD 5000m XC - 16:04

43 Second PR

FAST TRACK TRAINING

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AKSHAY MODY

Class of 2018 - UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO

Official Visits to BROWN UNIVERSITY and JOHN'S HOPKINS UNIVERSITY

FAST TRACK RECRUITING

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WILL MILLER

Class of 2018

SCHOOL RECORD 5000m XC - 15:34

VIRGINIA 2A STATE CHAMPION

47 Second PR

FAST TRACK TRAINING

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KATHLEEN MURPHY

Class of 2018 - UNITED STATES NAVAL ACADEMY

FAST TRACK RECRUITING

Pre-Season Pole Vault Training - COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING

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COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING -

BY BRANKO MIRIC APEX VAULTING

https://www.apexvaulting.com

Pre Season Training for Pole Vault. 

Despite popular belief, pole vaulters cannot train like sprinters. There have been many pole vaulters from my club who have gone on to colleges where they would do sprint workouts and lifting sessions on Mondays Wednesdays and Fridays, and the pole vault sessions were relegated to Tuesdays and Thursdays which essentially should be recovery days. In the long run, this will cause little improvement in the vaulter’s technique, max efforts in grip, push, and pole stiffness, and most importantly lead to run-throughs. Below I have outlined a typical Pre or early season workout schedule that focuses on volume. But ultimately as the season goes on any jumping, sprinting, and lifting should be lower volume and higher intensity. 

A word on intensity level in the pole vault. The way a coach can manage intensity and volume is by the approaches you have athletes take in practice. When in early season make sure to keep the intensity low with 1,2,3,4, and for the advanced 5 left approaches. At these length approaches athletes will not be hitting top end speed and you can prevent central nervous system fatigue while being able to do a higher volume of jumps 20-30 jumps in a session working out technical issues. I have even seen very fit athletic athletes take over 40 jumps in a session.

Once you are peaking later in the season you can use 6,7,8,9 or 10 lefts approaches and most athletes will take 7-20 jumps at most. These jumps would have a higher demand on the central nervous system, but certainly, the volume must be taken down. These jump sessions must be followed with at least three days of active rest before attempting to vault again from a full approach in order to allow the central nervous system time for a full recovery.

Early season phase. 

Monday and Friday

Warm-up

Warm up jug focused on open strides

Running drills

B skip

Straight leg

Bounding

High knee but kicks

Baby hurdles

2’ apart walks

4’, 5’, 6’ apart runs

I sometimes throw in a 4 step jumping drill without a pole to teach the athlete how to jump up properly with a penultimate step.

Planting drills and Pole Runs

Jumping

Athletes will perform 20-30 jumps from a 1left, 2 left and 3 left approach doing various drills: take off only focused on pole speed and jumping up, swing to a sit focusing on keeping the pole speed up and getting the hips past the bottom arm through pulling and landing deep into the pit, and finally swing to the belly where the athlete continues pulling their hips past their bottom arm and then turning and pushing off the top.

After jumping is completed athletes can do a short spring workout

Sprints

3-5 sets of 3-5 40-60 meter sprints

Lifting

Deadlift

Box Squat

Bench

Pull-ups

We follow a linear periodization

3-5 sets of 8-12 reps for all lifts at 60-70% of the 1 rep max

Auxiliary lifts that can aid in the progression of the main lifts can and should be added for 3-5 sets of 6-8 reps

Wednesday

Wednesdays are run like Mondays and Fridays except the jumping should not be taken past a 1 left approach in order to save the CNS. Also, no sprinting and lifts should be done for 3 sets and be at least 5-10% easier than Monday’s lift.

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday

Active recovery

Athletes should bike or jog for 15-20 min, and perform an abs circuit as well. Other restorative exercises like hypers and reverse hypers can also be done.

Sunday

Complete Rest

This, of course, is a quick overview of the system we utilize at Apex Vaulting. People can and should make adjustments to this system to fit their program, access to facilities, and specific situations.

Be Sure That You Are Eligible To Run, Jump, Vault or Throw in College – COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING

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COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING

 

By Willy Wood

If you want to compete in NCAA sports at a Division I school, you need to register with the NCAA Eligibility Center. 

See the time chart below provided by the NCAA to ensure that you are on track!

Grade 9

·       Ask your counselor for a list of your high school’s NCAA core courses to make sure you take the right classes.

Grade 10

·       Register with the NCAA Eligibility Center at eligibilitycenter.org.

Grade 11

·       Check with your counselor to make sure you will graduate on time with the required number of NCAA core courses.

·       Take the ACT or SAT and submit your scores to the NCAA using code 9999.

·       At the end of the year, ask your counselor to upload your official transcript to the NCAA Eligibility Center.

Grade 12

·       Finish your last NCAA core courses.

SAMPLE NCAA I TRAINING SCHEDULE - COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING

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COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING

WILLY WOOD

Below is a sample week of training during the first week of Holiday Vacation. This was done on their own at home. Keep in mind, the distance runners were still ascending to higher volume after a couple of down weeks after cross country, 

Sample NCAA I Training Schedule – Holiday Break

3000m – 5000m, MEN

Monday - 60 minutes easy .                      Tuesday -  50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides    Wednesday - 65 minutes easy            Thursday - 40 minutes easy                          Friday - 20 minutes easy + 2 x 2 miles @ 5:15 pace w/ 5’ easy + 20 minutes easy            Saturday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Sunday - 85 minutes easy

1500m – 5000m, MEN

Monday- 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides  Tuesday - 12 x 400m in 70 w/ 200m recovery jog                                                    Wednesday - 50 minutes easy                  Thursday - 35 minutes easy .                        Friday - 2 miles easy + 6 miles @ 5:30 - 5:40 pace + 2 miles easy .                                Saturday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Sunday - 85 minutes easy

15000m-5000m, WOMEN

Monday - 50 minutes easy                        Tuesday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Wednesday  - 60 minutes easy                Thursday - 30 minutes easy .                        Friday - 5 x 800m in 2:40 + 4 x 200m in 34 all w/ 2’ recovery .                                              Saturday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides                                                    Sunday - 85 minutes easy

800m, MEN

Monday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides  Tuesday - 4 x Mile in 5:15  with 2.5 min rest Wednesday - 50 minutes easy                Thursday - off                                                Friday - 50 minutes easy                          Saturday - 3 mile AT run @ 5:40, 5:30, 5:20 pace + 10 x 200m in 32 w/ 30” rest .                Sunday  - 65 - 75 minutes easy

800m, WOMEN

Monday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Tuesday - 10 x 400m in 80-82 w/ 200m recovery jog                                                      Wednesday - 50 minutes easy                    Thursday - off                                                Friday - 3 mile AT run @ 6:30, 6:20, 6:10pace + 6 x 200m in 35 w/ 200m recovery jog .          Saturday  - off                                                  Sunday - 60 minutes easy

Sprints, M&W

Monday - 2 x 10 min Hard on stationary bike w/ full recovery                                                Tuesday - weight training only .              Wednesday - 3 x ( 300m – rest 1’ – 300m) Men 45, Women 54 - 6 minutes between sets . Thursday - off .                                              Friday - weights                                          Saturday - 10 x 100m in 15m / 17w starting one on the minute (43-45” rest) .                      Sunday -  off

WANT TO COMPETE IN COLLEGE TRACK & FIELD / CROSS COUNTRY? – COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING

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COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING by Willy Wood

Participating in College Track and Field is no easy task. As mentioned in an earlier article only about 5% of high school participants will go on to compete at the next level. If you want to compete here are a few things you should know.

Although competing at the NCAA I level can be very appealing, you must realize that over 70% of colleges that sponsor track and field programs are non-Division I institutions, so cast your net wide when creating your list of possible options.

If you are looking for scholarship money, you must realize that this can be very difficult to come by in the sport of track and field. If fully funded, NCAA I men’s programs have 12.6 scholarships total to be spread out over all of the events. However, it is important to note, most programs are not fully funded. Also, this figure represents the total allotment of scholarship money, not a newly allocated annual amount. NCAA I women’s programs are allowed 18 scholarships, NCAA II men’s and women’s programs are allowed 12 and NCAA III schools do not offer athletic scholarships.  Most track and field scholarships are divided up among many individuals to ensure total event coverage.

If you are a senior, the Early Signing Period passed last month. The next signing date on the Calendar is April 11, 2018. You still have time to raise your test scores before that date and enhancing your recruitment chances. The next available SAT date is on March 10, 2018, while the next scheduled ACT test date is February 10, 2018.

How Difficult Is It To Run Track in College – College Track and Field Recruiting

College track and field recruiting

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COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING by Willy Wood

According to NCAA research, very few high school student-athletes have the opportunity to participate in college athletics, regardless of which division.  A recent look at the data suggests that only  5% of high school track and field athletes will participate in college. Obviously, there is a certain percentage of high school participants who voluntarily choose not to participate in college for a various reason, but still running at the next level demands hard work, sacrifice and a commitment to the process, both athletically and academically.

·      For more information on how to get recruited to run in college, click here – www.fasttrackrecruiting.com

·      For more information how to improve your current marks through personal coaching, click here – www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/ft-training

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