track recruiting

Liberty Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Athletics Department

Liberty University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Scholarship / Walk‐on

Men Women

100m 10.70 / 10.90 12.20 / 12.70

200m 21.60 / 22.00 25.00 / 25.70

400m 48.50 / 49.50 56.90/ 59.00

800m. 1:53.00 / 1:55.90 2:14.00 / 2:21.00

1600m 4:14.90/ 4:19.90 5:00.00 / 5:15.00

3200m 9:14.90 / 9:25.00 11:00.00 / 11:20.00

100/110H 14.60 / 15.00 14.60 / 15.20

300H 37.80 / 39.40 43.70 / 45.50

400H 53.70 55.50 61.20 / 63.70

High Jump 6' 8" / 6' 6" 5' 7" / 5' 4"

Pole Vault 16' 0"/ 15' 0" 12' 2" / 11' 6"

Long Jump 23' 4" / 22' 6" 18' 6" / 17' 8"

Triple Jump 48' / 46' 38' 6" / 36' 6"

Shot 60' HS / 56' HS 43' / 40'

Discus 180' HS / 170' HS 145' / 30'

Javelin 205' / 190' 130' / 120'

Hammer 180' 12‐lb / 150' 12‐lb 160' / 130'

Multi 6700 / 6000 4300 / 4000

Reaching these standards will not guarantee you an athletic scholarship or a spot on the team. There are many other factors considered such as academic record, scholarship availability and team needs.   Also note that scholarships can range in value from 10% to 100%. Each year there are a limited number of scholarships available. These scholarships are divided among Track & Field and Cross Country. The competition for these scholarships is extremely tough. Keep in mind that in addition to high school athletes, we consider Junior College graduates, transfers, international student‐athletes and current members of our team.

Liberty Men’s Track and Field Recruiting Questionnaire

Liberty Women’s Track and Field Recruiting Questionnaire

Liberty University Academic Ranking

College Track and Field Recruiting: Pomona-Pitzer

“An academically rigorous education” in a “low-stress California atmosphere.”

“An academically rigorous education” in a “low-stress California atmosphere.”

College Track and Field Recruiting

Pomona-Pitzer Track and Field

2020 Academic Ranking - Pomona College

Pomona College is ranked #5 in National Liberal Arts Colleges. Schools are ranked according to their performance across a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence.

#5 in National Liberal Arts Colleges

#25 in Best Undergraduate Teaching (tie)

#2 in Best Value Schools

2020 Academic Ranking - Pitzer College

Pitzer College is ranked #35 in National Liberal Arts Colleges. Schools are ranked according to their performance across a set of widely accepted indicators of excellence.

#35 in National Liberal Arts Colleges (tie)

POMONA-PITZER TRACK & FIELD AND CROSS COUNTRY

Quick Video Tour

Best Times and Performance List

Men’s Recruiting Questionnaire

Women’s Recruiting Questionnaire

NCAA III National Men’s Cross Country Rankings

NCAA III National Women’s Cross Country Rankings

Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Target Performance as a Junior

EVENT / BOYS / GIRLS

100m 11.30 / 13.20

200m 23.0 / 27.00

400m 51.5 / 60.0

110HH 15.50 / 15.5

300H 40.0 / 47.0

800m 2:00 / 2:24

1600m 4:30 / 5:25

3200m 9:50 / 11:30

LJ 20' / 17'

TJ 42' / 34'

HJ 5' 10" / 5'

PV 13' / 10'

SP 44' / 35'

Dis 130' / 120'

Three Things Track and Field Parents Should Understand Going Into The Recruiting Process

Track Recruiting

During my thirty-year college coaching career, I have had direct contact with approximately 10,000 cross country/track and field recruits. One of the most common remarks made to me by their parents was how challenging it is to navigate the recruiting process, particularly if it is your first time. Identifying the right school and program for your child presents an even greater challenge. The copious amounts of information you will receive from college coaches, other parents, former and current college athletes and the staff members at your high school will undoubtedly prove daunting. You have your work cut out for you, but if you start to logically piece together a plan of action you will be just fine.

I have had significant experience interacting with recruits of varying degrees of ability; from the number ranked athlete in the USA to a high school cross country team’s seventh runner. There is a place for everyone, whether it be at a power five school, an Ivy League institution, an NCAA I mid-major driven by revenue income generation for the university through increased enrollment or NCAA Division II / III and NAIA schools.

Over the course of my coaching career, I have identified a few basic principles that are applicable throughout the recruiting process, regardless of your child’s level of ability. The most critically important underlying themes that parents need to understand going into this process are as follows:

1. THIS IS A BUSINESS. You and your child are looking for the best deal possible. In turn, the coach who is recruiting you is looking for the very best athletes they can sign. Even in the sport of track and field, there is great pressure upon coaches to win. While I was a college coach, I had bonuses written into my contract that would pay me an additional 15-50% of my annual income based solely upon performance. It is important to not lose sight of this fact, however, this endeavor is an oddly two-sided process. You have the business aspect on one side, but you also have a personal relationship between the coach and athlete on the other side of the equation. The relationship in many ways will determine the success of this business endeavor. The relationship your child possesses with his coach will impact your child’s overall college experience and quality of their running career. If at all possible, don’t simply settle for the money – there is too much at stake. Fight for the best deal that you are able to obtain, but don’t give away quality of life for the deal.

2. EMPOWER YOUR CHILD - As a coach, one of the biggest red flags our staff identified during the early stages of the recruiting process was an overly involved parent. I cannot enumerate the number of times a comment such as “can we truly trust this person in the heat of battle” if their parents do everything for them” was uttered. It is imperative that you have your child initiate all communication throughout the recruiting process. I would suggest strict adherence to the following areas;

· Do not send e-mails on their behalf – it lessens their viability. As a coach, I received far too many “I know they are my son/daughter, but they are truly amazing” letters and e-mails.

· Make them speak even when they do not want to – they should answer the phone and ask the questions. You are not a screening service. If the coach is not important enough for you to speak with - eliminate that school from your shortlist.

· Let them shine – On official or unofficial visits take a backseat to your child. Let them read from the list of questions you created together. Avoid speaking on their behalf or interjecting to clarify for them. Walk a couple of steps behind when touring the campus so they may converse directly to the coach or student host.

3. KNOW YOUR ROLE - Although it is important to give your child independence and let them lead the way– guide them! Help them eliminate programs and schools to move forward in a logical direction to narrow down their options. Review their correspondences to coaches to ensure that their intent matches their wording. Help them weed through all of the hype of the recruiting pitches they will hear. In track and field, every program will sell themselves as up and coming – most aren’t! Do your research and try to determine if team members are quitting if they have an alarming number of injuries if there is truly a positive trajectory toward improvement.

The entire recruiting process can be daunting if you do not do your research. However, if you create a sound plan of attack it will be an amazing experience. You are helping your child with a critical step in their lives– do it wisely!

Recruiting Advice For Current Junior Track and Field Athletes

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You are already halfway through your junior year of high school and you will be a senior in eight months. Many programs have completed their recruiting classes for this year and are now focusing their efforts on next year's class -- this year's juniors. As it is now permissible for college coaches to call juniors, the recruiting process has already begun. To ensure that you take full advantage of this process, here are a few suggestions to help you find the right fit for you.

1. Cast A Wide Net

Your junior year is about seeing what's out there and what kind of school might be a good fit for you. If you have not yet done so create an expansive list of schools/programs that meet your specific needs and desires. Among factors to consider are affiliation (NCAA I, II, III, NAIA and JUCO), competitiveness of the program, cost of attendance, quality of education, geographical location, intended academic major, enrollment size, public vs private, and other factors that matter to you.  

Think about what may impact your athletic experience the most like coaching style, athlete retention, and success of the program. Determine if you are a good fit athletically -- many schools post their recruiting standards online.  

Know what the academic requirements are for the schools you are considering to determine if you are potentially admissible.  

Continually revise your list. During my coaching career, I often saw recruits close doors too early. They would rule out programs in their junior year of high school based on a variety of factors and then end up scrambling in the end when Plan A did not work out. Make sure to keep Plan B in play as to not have to settle for Plan C at the last minute.

2. Fill Out Online Recruiting Questionnaires

The online recruiting questionnaire is a good first and simple means to initiate communication with a program. It allows the coach to assess if you are a good fit for their program. In a recent interview with the Recruiting Code, Duke University head women's cross country coach Rhonda Riley was asked, "What are the important steps for an athlete to get noticed by you?" She responded, "The two ways to get on my radar are to fill out our online questionnaire and to follow up with an email. When a high school athlete takes the time to send an email with their contact information, personal best marks, academic information etc. it means they are serious about considering Duke as a potential university." Online recruiting questionnaires are typically very easy to find on individual schools' track and field websites.

3. Contact College Coaches

Over the span of my 30-year coaching career, I learned that communication is the most important element to reaching your goals. If you have not yet started -- start reaching out to college coaches from the schools on your list. You will be surprised at how effective personally reaching out to coaches will enhance your recruiting experience.  

Proofread every email before hitting send. A great deal of communication in the early phases of the recruiting process is going to be cut and paste on both sides, however, making a simple mistake can dehumanize the process and render the remainder of your communication less credible. Make sure you are addressing the proper institution and coach. I cannot tell you how many emails I received from recruits specifically addressed to a rival coach expressing their interest in a rival school.  

Send updates on a regular basis.  Most coaches receive dozens of emails from recruits each day so it's important that you keep yourself on their radar.

4. Take The ACT / SAT

Register and take the SAT/ACT during your junior year. If you feel adequately prepared, I would suggest taking the test in the fall of your junior year. This will allow you plenty of time to take it for the second time in the spring. Everyone's test prep is going to vary based on their own strengths, weaknesses, schedule, and goals. At the very minimum, though, all students should try to put in 10 hours of focused test prep, at least to get familiar with the format and timing of the test. Realistically, you would need to put in much more time over a sustained period to do well.

However, if you are not ready to take the test do not view it as a test-run. Do not take the test until you have prepared to do so at a level that is reflective of your academic potential.

If you are considering attending a highly selective academic institution taking the test earlier will significantly enhance your recruitment. Most selective schools will not vigorously pursue a potential-student athlete without test scores to determine admissibility.

5. Utilize Unofficial Visits

Unofficial visits can help you gather significant information about individual programs and schools. This time will allow you an opportunity to meet the coach in person, tour the college, check out the athletic facilities, and possibly meet current team members.

Do your homework - know who and where you are visiting. Have a keen understanding of the unique strengths of each school and team, as it will show the respective coaching staff how serious you are about their program. Use this time to learn as much as you can about the program and coaching staff. Identify the factors that will be most important to you in determining if you will return for an official visit. Have a short list of specific questions ready that address the most critical factors in your college decision.

There is no imposed limit on the number of unofficial visits you may take, so take as many as possible. There is no better tool to help you hone in on the best school/program for you.

In summary:  

Your junior year is quickly passing and it is time to start seriously considering where you want to continue your academic and athletic pursuits. Do not be passive -- start reaching out to college coaches now. Be aggressive in your outreach and email every program that you are interested in, regardless of the perceived reach. Be your own greatest advocate and take charge of your future.

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING - Three Things Parents Must Understand Going into the Recruiting Process

by Willy Wood

During my 30-year college coaching career, I have had direct contact with approximately 10,000 cross country/track and field recruits of varying degrees of ability; from the No. 1 ranked athlete in the USA, to a high school cross country team's seventh runner.

One of the most common remarks made to me by their parents was how challenging it is to navigate the recruiting process, particularly if it is your first time. There is a place for everyone, whether it be at a power five school, an Ivy League institution, an NCAA I mid-major driven by revenue income generation for the university, through increased enrollment or NCAA Division II / III and NAIA schools. Identifying that right school and program for your child is the greatest challenge.


The copious amounts of information you will receive from college coaches, other parents, former and current college athletes, and the staff members at your high school will undoubtedly prove daunting. You have your work cut out for you, but if you start to logically piece together a plan of action you will be just fine.

Here are the most critically important underlying themes that as parents you need to understand going into this process:

1) THIS IS A BUSINESS

You and your child are looking for the best deal possible. In turn, the coach who is recruiting you is looking for the very best athletes they can sign. Even in the sport of track and field, there is great pressure upon coaches to win. While I was a college coach, I had bonuses written into my contract that would pay me an additional 15-50% of my annual income based solely upon performance. It is important to not lose sight of the fact that this endeavor is an oddly two-sided equation.

You have the business aspect on one side, but you also have a personal relationship between the coach and athlete on the other side. The relationship in many ways will determine the success of this business endeavor. The relationship your child possesses with his coach will impact your child's overall college experience and quality of their running career. If at all possible, don't simply settle for the money -- there is too much at stake. Fight for the best deal that you are able to obtain, but don't give away quality of life for the deal.

2) EMPOWER YOUR CHILD

As a coach, one of the biggest red flags our staff identified during the early stages of the recruiting process was overly involved parents. I cannot enumerate the number of times our staff uttered a comment such as "Can we truly trust this person in the heat of battle if their parents do everything for them?" It is imperative that you have your child initiate all communication throughout the recruiting process. I would suggest strict adherence to the following areas:

Do not send e-mails on their behalf. It lessens their viability. As a coach, I received far too many, "I know they are my son/daughter, but they are truly amazing" letters and e-mails.

Make them speak even when they do not want to. They should answer the phone and ask questions. You are not a screening service. If the coach is not important enough for you to speak with, eliminate that school from your shortlist.

Let them shine. On official, or unofficial, visits take a backseat to your child. Let them read from the list of questions you created together. Avoid speaking on their behalf or interjecting to clarify for them. Walk a couple of steps behind when touring the campus so they may converse directly to the coach or student host.

3) KNOW YOUR ROLE

Although it is important to give your child independence and let them lead the way-- guide them! Help them eliminate programs and schools to move forward in a logical direction that narrows down their options. Review their correspondences to coaches to ensure that their intent matches their wording.

Help them weed through all the hype of the recruiting pitches they will hear. In track and field, every program will sell themselves as up and coming -- most aren't! Do your research and try to determine if team members are quitting if they have an alarming number of injuries if there is truly a positive trajectory toward improvement.

The entire recruiting process can be daunting if you do not do your research. However, if you create a sound plan of attack it will be an amazing experience. You are helping your child with a monumental step in their lives. Do it wisely!

***

Willy Wood boasts 26 highly successful years of NCAA Division I head coaching experience, two decades of which were spent at Columbia University. He recently developed a recruiting service designed specifically for high school track and field/ cross country athletes -- www.fasttrackrecruiting.com