Coaching

Train Like a Sub 1:50 800m Runner

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRIANING

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Here is a look at how we trained our 800m runners at this time of the year. Our training was often influenced by the weather. As a result, we were not able to run hill intervals as much as I would have liked - so we pushed that phase back to March and April. Here is a sample week from January.

Monday - 50 minutes easy

Tuesday - 6 x 800m in 2:20 w/ 2’ rest

Wednesday - 50 minutes easy

Thursday - 2 (200m, 400m, 200m, 200m in 26, 55, 28, 28) full recovery between sets

Friday - 50 minutes easy

Saturday - 2 x 2 mile @ 5:30 pace w/ 5 minute recovery

Sunday - 1:20 easy

Pre-Season Pole Vault Training - COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING

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COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING -

BY BRANKO MIRIC APEX VAULTING

https://www.apexvaulting.com

Pre Season Training for Pole Vault.

Despite popular belief, pole vaulters cannot train like sprinters. There have been many pole vaulters from my club who have gone on to colleges where they would do sprint workouts and lifting sessions on Mondays Wednesdays and Fridays, and the pole vault sessions were relegated to Tuesdays and Thursdays which essentially should be recovery days. In the long run, this will cause little improvement in the vaulter’s technique, max efforts in grip, push, and pole stiffness, and most importantly lead to run-throughs. Below I have outlined a typical Pre or early season workout schedule that focuses on volume. But ultimately as the season goes on any jumping, sprinting, and lifting should be lower volume and higher intensity.

A word on intensity level in the pole vault. The way a coach can manage intensity and volume is by the approaches you have athletes take in practice. When in early season make sure to keep the intensity low with 1,2,3,4, and for the advanced 5 left approaches. At these length approaches athletes will not be hitting top end speed and you can prevent central nervous system fatigue while being able to do a higher volume of jumps 20-30 jumps in a session working out technical issues. I have even seen very fit athletic athletes take over 40 jumps in a session.

Once you are peaking later in the season you can use 6,7,8,9 or 10 lefts approaches and most athletes will take 7-20 jumps at most. These jumps would have a higher demand on the central nervous system, but certainly, the volume must be taken down. These jump sessions must be followed with at least three days of active rest before attempting to vault again from a full approach in order to allow the central nervous system time for a full recovery.

Early season phase.

Monday and Friday

Warm-up

Warm up jug focused on open strides

Running drills

B skip

Straight leg

Bounding

High knee but kicks

Baby hurdles

2’ apart walks

4’, 5’, 6’ apart runs

I sometimes throw in a 4 step jumping drill without a pole to teach the athlete how to jump up properly with a penultimate step.

Planting drills and Pole Runs

Jumping

Athletes will perform 20-30 jumps from a 1left, 2 left and 3 left approach doing various drills: take off only focused on pole speed and jumping up, swing to a sit focusing on keeping the pole speed up and getting the hips past the bottom arm through pulling and landing deep into the pit, and finally swing to the belly where the athlete continues pulling their hips past their bottom arm and then turning and pushing off the top.

After jumping is completed athletes can do a short spring workout

Sprints

3-5 sets of 3-5 40-60 meter sprints

Lifting

Deadlift

Box Squat

Bench

Pull-ups

We follow a linear periodization

3-5 sets of 8-12 reps for all lifts at 60-70% of the 1 rep max

Auxiliary lifts that can aid in the progression of the main lifts can and should be added for 3-5 sets of 6-8 reps

Wednesday

Wednesdays are run like Mondays and Fridays except the jumping should not be taken past a 1 left approach in order to save the CNS. Also, no sprinting and lifts should be done for 3 sets and be at least 5-10% easier than Monday’s lift.

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday

Active recovery

Athletes should bike or jog for 15-20 min, and perform an abs circuit as well. Other restorative exercises like hypers and reverse hypers can also be done.

Sunday

Complete Rest

This, of course, is a quick overview of the system we utilize at Apex Vaulting. People can and should make adjustments to this system to fit their program, access to facilities, and specific situations.

SAMPLE NCAA I TRAINING SCHEDULE - COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING

Ed Cheserek

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING

WILLY WOOD

Below is a sample week of training during the first week of Holiday Vacation. This was done on their own at home. Keep in mind, the distance runners were still ascending to higher volume after a couple of down weeks after cross country,

Sample NCAA I Training Schedule – Holiday Break

3000m – 5000m, MEN

Monday - 60 minutes easy . Tuesday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Wednesday - 65 minutes easy Thursday - 40 minutes easy Friday - 20 minutes easy + 2 x 2 miles @ 5:15 pace w/ 5’ easy + 20 minutes easy Saturday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Sunday - 85 minutes easy

1500m – 5000m, MEN

Monday- 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Tuesday - 12 x 400m in 70 w/ 200m recovery jog Wednesday - 50 minutes easy Thursday - 35 minutes easy . Friday - 2 miles easy + 6 miles @ 5:30 - 5:40 pace + 2 miles easy . Saturday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Sunday - 85 minutes easy

15000m-5000m, WOMEN

Monday - 50 minutes easy Tuesday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Wednesday - 60 minutes easy Thursday - 30 minutes easy . Friday - 5 x 800m in 2:40 + 4 x 200m in 34 all w/ 2’ recovery . Saturday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Sunday - 85 minutes easy

800m, MEN

Monday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Tuesday - 4 x Mile in 5:15 with 2.5 min rest Wednesday - 50 minutes easy Thursday - off Friday - 50 minutes easy Saturday - 3 mile AT run @ 5:40, 5:30, 5:20 pace + 10 x 200m in 32 w/ 30” rest . Sunday - 65 - 75 minutes easy

800m, WOMEN

Monday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides Tuesday - 10 x 400m in 80-82 w/ 200m recovery jog Wednesday - 50 minutes easy Thursday - off Friday - 3 mile AT run @ 6:30, 6:20, 6:10pace + 6 x 200m in 35 w/ 200m recovery jog . Saturday - off Sunday - 60 minutes easy

Sprints, M&W

Monday - 2 x 10 min Hard on stationary bike w/ full recovery Tuesday - weight training only . Wednesday - 3 x ( 300m – rest 1’ – 300m) Men 45, Women 54 - 6 minutes between sets . Thursday - off . Friday - weights Saturday - 10 x 100m in 15m / 17w starting one on the minute (43-45” rest) . Sunday - off

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING - December, 800m Training

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Below is an actual week of training for our 800m men from a couple of years ago. We had five guys run sub 1:50 that season. These guys had good natural speed - all could split 47-48 in the 4 x 400m and each was able to run a competitive 1500m - 3:47-3:50 range. Almost all of our 800m training revolved around the training concepts of "Gags", combining strength work and speed development always close.

Monday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides

Tuesday - 4 x Mile in 5:15, 5:10, 5:05, 5:00 with 2 min rest + 6 x 200m in 28 w/ 2’ rest

Wednesday - 50 minutes easy

Thursday - 50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides

Friday - 3 mile AT run on the track 5:30, 5:20, 5:10 + 10 x 200m in 30 w/ 30” rec

Saturday - 85 minutes easy

Sunday - off

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING – TRAIN LIKE A TOP LEVEL NCAA 200m-400m RUNNER

Fast Track Recruiting

Below you will find the actual training schedule from mid-December of a 200m - 400m college male who ended up running 20.96 and 45.67 in the Spring.

Monday

AM – Weights PM – 2 sets of 200-400-200-200 with 90 seconds. rest / 8 minutes between sets

Set 1: 30.7-63.7-31.3-30.8 / Set 2: 30.3-61-31.4-29.3

Tuesday

10 x Stadiums . 4 DBL Leg Hops . 5 Ramps 4 Skips

Wednesday

Hurdle Walkovers

Thursday

AM – Weights . PM - Bounding

Friday

Speed Improvement – Hurdles, Sleds, High Knees

6 x 200 with 90 seconds rest

32.1-30.6-30.9-29.6-28.0-27.1

Saturday

AM – 8 x 250m Hills

Sunday

off

TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING - EVAN JAGER, EARLY SEASON

Evan Jager

Brianne Eaton has created an amazing website with a wealth of nutritional information. I highly suggest that you visit her site - www.waaretheeatons.com

There is a great article highlighting the training and diet of Evan Jager - definitely worth the read as this guy is killing it! Here is a look at a sample training week during his early season base phase.

Monday - AM 70 minutes easy PM 35 minutes easy

Tuesday - 7 x 1 MIle with 90" rest

Wednesday - 70 minutes easy

Thursday - 2 sets of 8 x 200m PM 50 minutes easy

Friday - 70 minutes easy

Saturday - 2 Hour Long Run

Sunday - 70 minutes easy

TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING - TRAIN LIKE A WORLD CLASS TRIPLE JUMPER

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NADIA EKE - 45' 7" / 13.99m - TRIPLE JUMP, GHANA NATIONAL TEAM, 2017 LONDON WOLRD TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS - 23rd in the WORLD!

Anyone who knows anything about the triple jump knows that it is not only a very technical event but also very physically demanding. It is obvious one has to be strong enough to handle the impact of the event, but most people underestimate the importance of speed. The biggest difference for me in my post-collegiate career is shifting the focus from strictly maximum strength to a combination of speed and strength endurance. Whether it is running for longer distances at higher intensities or taking less recovery time in between jumps in practice; this is the time of the year where that foundation is built.

PRESEASON TRAINING WEEK

Monday: Technique and Strength -Triple Jump Technical work ie. Bounding, jump drills - Strength training (Olympic Lifting)

Tuesday: Speed endurance (75-80% intensity) -4 x (2 x 150) recover 1 minute between reps and 5 mins between sets

Wednesday: Strength Endurance/ Active Recovery - Lap swim: 10 laps with kickboard (50m each lap) 45 seconds recovery between laps - Yoga or 1 hour of stretch routine

Thursday: Speed and Running Technique (100% intensity) - Wicket Drills (sprint over mini hurdles) 2x (5 x 30m); 2 minutes between rep - 3 x 60m sprint (3 minutes rest) - Hurdle mobility

Friday: Technique and Strength - Long Jump or less dominant legwork for triple jump - Strength Training (Olympic Lifting )

Saturday: OFF

Sunday: Easy 5-10 minute jog 1-hour stretch

TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING - Tempo Work For Sprinters And 800m Runners

Tempo Run Track and Field Training

To fully optimize preseason track and field training for sprinters, hurdlers and middle distance runners it important to pay special attention to aerobic conditioning. This system of training can be easily forgotten or pushed to the side in favor of high-quality interval and/or explosive work. Tempo type workouts will allow you to develop your aerobic capacity and in turn will allow you to handle the rounds or numerous races in a day. It will also allow you to train at a higher level later in the season as you will recover much more quickly. Below are a few of my favorite sprint tempo workouts – stolen by some the nation’s very best coaches.

100m-200m: 6 x 200m descending rest series.

You will perform this same workout once a week for three consecutive weeks. Week one will have a rest period of 90 seconds, week two – 75 seconds and week three – 60 seconds. The 200’s should be run at the same time each week. Try to work your way down to your PR in the 200m +8 seconds over time.

400m: 5 x 300m descending rest series.

As above, you will perform this same workout once a week for three consecutive weeks. Week one will have a rest period of 90 seconds, week two – 75 seconds and week three – 60 seconds. The 300’s should be run at the same time each week. Try to work your way down to your PR in the 400m for the 300m.

800m: 6-8 x 600m descending rest series.

As above, you will perform this same workout once a week for three consecutive weeks. Week one will have a rest period of 90 seconds, week two – 75 seconds and week three – 60 seconds. The 600’s should be run at the same time each week. Try to work your way down to about 8 seconds under your PR in the 800m for the 600m.

TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING - What To Do When The Cross Country Season Is Over

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I have been asked numerous times over the past couple of weeks what to do in regard to training after the cross country season concludes. Obviously, you will need some downtime to ensure you physically and mentally recover from the season. However, you need to balance this with not losing the fitness you acquired over the past several months. I used to give our runners two weeks completely off and then would spend the next six weeks ascending to full volume. Over the years, I learned that if we stayed active during the first couple of weeks after the season that our runners stayed healthier and maintained greater levels of fitness. It always seemed that our runners would start experiencing pains and/or developing injuries while we were in the middle of complete rest. It just never seemed to work effectively for us. So, I changed the phase name from Rest & Rejuvenation to Active Rest. I would prescribe a small shakeout run the day after the last meet and then have them take 2-3 days off. After that, our runners would run 30-35 every other day to finish out the week – the pace assigned during this period of time was embarrassingly slow. To transition out of light running every other day, we would run two days in a row – then rest one day, run three days – rest one and then start up again. Our first week after our Active Rest phase was typically 50% of their goal volume with two days of easy strides – around 10k pace-ish at the fastest.

Below is our first two weeks after the conclusion of XC

WEEK ONE

Monday 35 minutes easy

Tuesday off

Wednesday 35 minutes easy

Thursday off

Friday 35 minutes easy

Saturday 35 minutes easy

Sunday off

WEEK TWO

Monday 35 minutes easy

Tuesday 30 minutes easy + 4 x 100m strides

Wednesday 35 minutes easy

Thursday off

Friday 35 minutes easy + 5 x 100m strides

Saturday 40 minutes easy

Sunday 35 minutes easy

5 BULLET FRIDAY - What to Read, Watch, Eat, Ponder and Discover!

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What to Read – Check out legendary coach, Clyde Hart’s training methodology for the 400m. His training schedules are not for the faint of heart. The schedules require a lot of volume for a sprinter, but if you make it through relatively unscathed you will run very fast! - https://www.usatf.org/groups/Coaches/library/2007/Sprint%20Training/Clyde_Hart3.pdf

What to Watch – Nick Symmonds briefly discusses training for the 800m. It is a short video but gives some insight into the plan he followed. The video may be found here - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-Y3ZBFHx9w

What to Eat - Olympian Kate Grace discusses how to eat like an elite runner here https://www.runnersworld.com/eat-like-an-elite/eat-like-an-elite-kate-grace

What to Ponder – “The voice inside your head who says you can’t do this is a liar” – unknown

What to see on Social Media – Ever wonder what a long run with the Colorado XC team looks like? https://twitter.com/CUBuffsTrack/status/920683355225673729