ncaa I recruiting

Track and Field Recruiting: Three Things To Consider When E-Mailing A College Coach

Fast Track Recruiting

Over the span of my thirty-year coaching career, I learned that communication is the most important element to reaching your goals. It is imperative that you learn to communicate openly and effectively with your parents, high school coach, and college coaches.

More specifically, when sending an initial email to a college coach expressing your interest clearly articulate yourself. Here are three suggestions to consider when emailing college coaches.

 

1. COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY

Be brief. Clearly and concisely articulate who you are. There is no need to list what place you finished at your conference meet or how competitive your high school is academically. Express your interest in their specific school and program, list your PR’s and provide your essential academic information – GPA and test scores.  Avoid phrases such as “I am confident that I can contribute greatly to your program” if you are not yet performing at a level close to the team’s current athletes.

  

2. COMMUNICATE PROFESSIONALLY

In most cases, your initial e-mail to a college coach will be your first impression. Make it impactful. Avoid slang terms, misspellings and formatting mistakes. Carefully proofread every email before hitting send. Be sure if you cut and paste that the formatting is not changed clearly exposing such. Finally, be sure that the coach’s name and school are correct. On several occasions while I was coaching at Columbia I would receive emails addressed to other coaches and/or colleges expressing interest on one of our rival schools. Send a couple of test emails to your self first to ensure there are not weird font or text size changes where you have cut and pasted new names.

  

3. COMMUNICATE EFFICIENTLY

Prior to sending your email complete the school’s online recruiting questionnaire. Your e-mails should be extremely easy to read. Avoid sending attachments – there is no reason to include them on your initial email and they will most likely not be opened. Provide clear and easily seen contact information.

The recruiting process can be daunting. There are so many unknowns throughout the entire process. However, if you get started early, put in the work and take an active role you will find the right fit.

College Track and Field Recruiting - What Should I Be Doing In My Sophomore Year In High School?

College Track and Field Recruiting

In less than a year, college coaches will be allowed to start contacting you. On September 01 of your Junior year, your recruiting process will begin. As a result, it is imperative that you devise a plan of action now.

Below are three suggestions for you to consider during your sophomore year of high school to optimize your college recruitment experience:

DETERMINE THE BEST FIT FOR YOU

Create an expansive list of schools/programs that meet your specific needs and desires.  Among factors to consider are affiliation level (NCAA I, II, III, NAIA, and JUCO), competitiveness of the program, cost of attendance, quality of education, geographical location, intended academic major, enrollment size, public vs private, and other factors that matter to YOU.

Do not be mesmerized by the name of a school. See beyond the prowess of their football and basketball programs or their academic reputation. Make sure the schools you choose meets your needs for reasons beyond it simply being cool to tell the world you will be running or studying at a particular school. There is much more to college track and field than simply Division I.

Create a list of schools that you would be happy at without track and field - just in case your athletic career does not go as planned.

TAKE CHARGE 

Do not be passive. Start reaching out to college coaches now from the schools on your list. In my personal dealings with high school student-athletes, I often heard prospects state that the schools on their list were comprised solely of programs that contacted them. If a program you’re interested in does not reach out to you, reach out to them! You will be surprised at how effective personally reaching out will enhance your recruiting experience.

Start to visit colleges during your sophomore year. Take a campus tour, check out the athletic facilities and eat lunch at a local restaurant. Start to get an idea of what it is you want in a college. You can’t sit down and speak with the coach until your Junior year, but you if you happen to bump into them you can say, hi.

COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY

Over the span of my thirty-year coaching career, I learned that communication is the most important element to reaching your goals. It is imperative that you learn to communicate openly and effectively with your parents, high school coach, and college coaches.

Because it is only your sophomore year college coaches are not allowed to respond to your emails and other forms of communication, but now is still a good time to start reaching out. Fill out their online questionnaire. Send an email expressing your interest in their program and give them a brief overview of who you are as an athlete and student.

Your sophomore year is a great time to begin readying yourself for the process that is about to begin. You should view this time as your pre-season training. Although there will be no meets during this time the work and preparation that you do now will be critical to future success.

For more recruiting information click below:

What Should I Be Doing in My Senior Year 

What Should I Be Doing in My Junior Year 

 

How Good Do I Need To Be To Get a Partial Scholarship for Track and Field at an NCAA I (Power 5) School ?

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TRACK AND FIELD SCHOLARSHIPS

In the sport of track and field/cross country getting a full athletic scholarship is extremely difficult. Men's Track and Field programs are allowed a maximum of 12.6 scholarships while the women are allotted 18. However, with over 20 events contested at the collegiate level,  programs need to spread out their scholarship money. As a result, it is extremely common for track and field and cross country programs to offer partial athletic scholarships.

Below you will find the general recruiting standards NCAA I Power 5 Schools are using to decide whether or not to offer a partial athletic scholarship. Remember, these standards are from "big-time" division one programs. Mid-major programs will have slightly lesser standards depending on their level competitiveness.  

 

TRACK AND FIELD STANDARDS FOR A PARTIAL ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP

 

EVENT       MEN        WOMEN                             

100m          10.50       11.70

200m          21.40       24.00

400m          47.50       54.20

800m          1:52          2:12

1600m         4:12         4:55

3200m         9:10         10:45

110HH        14.00      14.00 (100H)

300IH          37.50        43.00

400IH          52.80       60.00

PV                16'           12' 6"

LJ                 24'            19'

TJ                 49'            40'

HJ                6' 10"        5' 8"

SP                60'             47'

Dis              185'            155'

Jav             205'           145'

Ham           225'            185' 

   

WALK-ON STANDARDS -  For more information on NCAA I TRACK AND FIELD Walk-On Standards (CLICK HERE) 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON IVY LEAGUE TRACK AND FIELD STANDARDS (CLICK HERE)