RECRUITING STANDARDS

Iowa Track and Field Recruiting Standards

College Track and Field Recruiting - What Should I Be Doing In My Sophomore Year In High School?

College Track and Field Recruiting

In less than a year, college coaches will be allowed to start contacting you. On September 01 of your Junior year, your recruiting process will begin. As a result, it is imperative that you devise a plan of action now.

Below are three suggestions for you to consider during your sophomore year of high school to optimize your college recruitment experience:

DETERMINE THE BEST FIT FOR YOU

Create an expansive list of schools/programs that meet your specific needs and desires.  Among factors to consider are affiliation level (NCAA I, II, III, NAIA, and JUCO), competitiveness of the program, cost of attendance, quality of education, geographical location, intended academic major, enrollment size, public vs private, and other factors that matter to YOU.

Do not be mesmerized by the name of a school. See beyond the prowess of their football and basketball programs or their academic reputation. Make sure the schools you choose meets your needs for reasons beyond it simply being cool to tell the world you will be running or studying at a particular school. There is much more to college track and field than simply Division I.

Create a list of schools that you would be happy at without track and field - just in case your athletic career does not go as planned.

TAKE CHARGE 

Do not be passive. Start reaching out to college coaches now from the schools on your list. In my personal dealings with high school student-athletes, I often heard prospects state that the schools on their list were comprised solely of programs that contacted them. If a program you’re interested in does not reach out to you, reach out to them! You will be surprised at how effective personally reaching out will enhance your recruiting experience.

Start to visit colleges during your sophomore year. Take a campus tour, check out the athletic facilities and eat lunch at a local restaurant. Start to get an idea of what it is you want in a college. You can’t sit down and speak with the coach until your Junior year, but you if you happen to bump into them you can say, hi.

COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY

Over the span of my thirty-year coaching career, I learned that communication is the most important element to reaching your goals. It is imperative that you learn to communicate openly and effectively with your parents, high school coach, and college coaches.

Because it is only your sophomore year college coaches are not allowed to respond to your emails and other forms of communication, but now is still a good time to start reaching out. Fill out their online questionnaire. Send an email expressing your interest in their program and give them a brief overview of who you are as an athlete and student.

Your sophomore year is a great time to begin readying yourself for the process that is about to begin. You should view this time as your pre-season training. Although there will be no meets during this time the work and preparation that you do now will be critical to future success.

For more recruiting information click below:

What Should I Be Doing in My Senior Year 

What Should I Be Doing in My Junior Year 

 

How Good Do I Need To Be To Get a Partial Scholarship for Track and Field at an NCAA I (Power 5) School ?

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TRACK AND FIELD SCHOLARSHIPS

In the sport of track and field/cross country getting a full athletic scholarship is extremely difficult. Men's Track and Field programs are allowed a maximum of 12.6 scholarships while the women are allotted 18. However, with over 20 events contested at the collegiate level,  programs need to spread out their scholarship money. As a result, it is extremely common for track and field and cross country programs to offer partial athletic scholarships.

Below you will find the general recruiting standards NCAA I Power 5 Schools are using to decide whether or not to offer a partial athletic scholarship. Remember, these standards are from "big-time" division one programs. Mid-major programs will have slightly lesser standards depending on their level competitiveness.  

 

TRACK AND FIELD STANDARDS FOR A PARTIAL ATHLETIC SCHOLARSHIP

 

EVENT       MEN        WOMEN                             

100m          10.50       11.70

200m          21.40       24.00

400m          47.50       54.20

800m          1:52          2:12

1600m         4:12         4:55

3200m         9:10         10:45

110HH        14.00      14.00 (100H)

300IH          37.50        43.00

400IH          52.80       60.00

PV                16'           12' 6"

LJ                 24'            19'

TJ                 49'            40'

HJ                6' 10"        5' 8"

SP                60'             47'

Dis              185'            155'

Jav             205'           145'

Ham           225'            185' 

   

WALK-ON STANDARDS -  For more information on NCAA I TRACK AND FIELD Walk-On Standards (CLICK HERE) 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON IVY LEAGUE TRACK AND FIELD STANDARDS (CLICK HERE)

USC TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING STANDARDS

USC Track and Field Recruiting Standards

TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING

How hard is it to compete for the USC Trojan Track and Field Team? Check out the standards below for the 2018 NCAA National Champion Women and the 4th Place Men. It is no easy task to run for the Trojans, but if you have what it takes to fill out their recruiting questionnaire below. 

USC MEN'S TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING QUESTIONNAIRE

USC WOMEN'S TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING QUESTIONNAIRE   

 

USC TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING STANDARDS

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NYU Track and Field Recruiting Standards

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NYU Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Interested in competing in Track and Field/Cross Country at NYU – check out their preliminary recruiting standards at the bottom of this article.

 

2018 NYU Top Performers - 

Men – 48.04 – 400m, 1:52.92 – 800m, 31:15.66 – 10000m

Women – 17:56.22 – 5000m, 400IH – 62.39, 38 ‘ 2” – Triple Jump

 

Coaching Staff – Amazingly Accomplished Former Athletes

Head Coach – Erison Hurtault – 2008 and 2012 Olympian, NCAA I All-American, Ivy League Champion – BIO

Assistant Coach – Nicole Traynor – NCAA I All-American and USA Olympic Trials Qualifier – BIO

Assistant Coach – John Trautman – 1992 Olympian, Former DMR World Record Holder, NCAA I All-American – BIO

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Did You know that 19% of NYU’s Class of 2018 are non-US citizens –NYU actually has the highest number of International Students of any school in the United States.

#2 BEST COLLEGES FOR FILM AND PHOTOGRAPHY

CURRENT US NEWS AND WORLD REPORT NATIONAL RANKINGS – 30th

 

NYU RECRUITING STANDARDS:

Event            Men              Women

100m            11.20               12.90

200m           23.00             26.50

400m           51.50              60.00

800m           2:01.00         2:25.00

110 / 100mH  15.50           15.80

300mIH        42.25             48.70

400mH         58.00            65.00

1600m           4:35              5:25

3200m          10:00            11:45

Long Jump       21'             17’

Triple Jump    42’6”            35’

High Jump      6’ 0”            5’ 2”

Shot Put          42’               35’

Discus             120’            105’

Javelin           154' 2"         95' 1"

Hammer          140’            125’

Pole Vault         13'             10'

5k XC             16:30           19:45

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON RECRUITING STANDARDS AT SIMILAR SCHOOLS CLICK BELOW

IVY LEAGUE RECRUITING STANDARDS

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD FAST TRACK STANDARDS

MIT TRACK AND FIELD 

WAKE FOREST TRACK AND FIELD  

HARVARD TRACK AND FIELD

COLUMBIA TRACK AND FIELD

AM I FAST ENOUGH - TRACK AND FIELD RECRUITING STANDARDS

Track Recruiting

Want to know what you need to run, jump or throw to get the attention of the schools of your dreams? I have provided links to numerous schools below. Most indicate what performance they require from you to either walk-on or gain an athletic scholarship.

I would caution you to take this information with a gigantic grain of salt. Many program’s list of published standards is more their dream wish list as opposed to their actual line in the sand list. Numerous programs list rather stringent walk-on standards, but a simply quick perusal of their teams performances at www.tfrrs.org will clearly show that many athletes in their program (regardless of year in college) are incapable of hitting the listed walk-on standard expected of high school athletes.

My point – don’t be discouraged if you don’t hit their published marks – just keep improving and striving toward that mark. Use the recruiting process to sell yourself effectively! However, if you are not anywhere near their walk-on times, you may want to consider other options.

MIT Track and Field Recruiting Standards

University of Alabama Recruiting Standards:

Harvard Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

University of Michigan Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Columbia University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

University of Miami Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Purdue University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Western Carolina University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

University of North Carolina Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Liberty University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Cal-Berkely Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

Auburn University Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

University of Iowa Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

Loyola University Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Dartmouth Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

Penn Track and Field Recruiting Standards:

Fast Track Recruiting Ivy League Track and Field Recruiting Standards

Staying Healthy With Supplemental Training

Training at a high level requires a great commitment from you beyond the willingness to simply put in the work. It is imperative that you live a "righteous" lifestyle to ward off injury and/or overtraining. You must give top priority to what coaches often refer to as the little things, but are monumentally important - sleep, nutrition, hydration, flexibility, preventative modalities are as important as the workouts you are doing. I would suggest adding the following strength/mobility exercise routines to your weekly training.

http://www.njsportsmed.com/files/myrtl_routine.pdf

http://www.tgiathdev.com/uploads/1/6/0/9/16092096/back_routine_jay_johnson.pdf