Distance

800m - 1500m Training - How We Trained The Week of Penn Relays

Licoln Financial Field

800m - 1500m Track Training

Here is a look at what we did the year we won the Penn Relays 4 x 800m.

1500m Runners

Monday           50 – 65 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides + weights

Tuesday           2 x Mile in 4:44 w/ 3’ rest + 2 x 800m in 2:12 w/ 90" - rest 3' + 4 x 400m in 62 w/90", 1 x Mile in 4:20

 Wednesday    am       0 - 30 minutes easy     pm       50 minutes easy + weights

Thursday         35 minutes easy      or        am       0 - 30 minutes easy   pm 50 minutes easy

Friday              PENN RELAYS        or         35 minutes easy

Saturday         PENN RELAYS         or        50 minutes easy

Sunday            1:30 – 1:45 easy

 

800m Runners

Monday           50 minutes easy + 6 x 100m strides

Tuesday           4 x 800m in 2:14 w/ 2’ rest + 400m 28/25

Wednesday     50 minutes easy + weights

Thursday         30 minutes easy + 2 x 200m in 28

Friday               PENN RELAYS

Saturday          PENN RELAYS

Sunday            75 – 85 minutes easy

Columbia University 4 x 800m - 2007 Penn Relays

Licoln Financial Field

Written By: Liam Boylan Pett, Lope Magazine

“We’ve got Kansas, Oral Roberts, Mississippi State, LSU, Michigan, Seton Hall, Georgetown, Villanova all in this mix. But it’s Columbia, in the light blue, leading.”

That’s what Mark Floreani, announcing for FloTrack, said on April 28, 2007, when Erison Hurtault handed me the baton with a five-meter lead in the Penn Relays College Men’s 4×800 Championship of America. Our first leg, Mike Mark, handed off in third before Jonah Rathbun kept us in the race through two exchanges, handing off in fourth. Then Erison unleashed an unruly kick, passing seven runners on the final turn, and there we were: with two laps to go, Columbia University was in perfect position to win the 4×8 at Penn.

As noted by Floreani, who listed off eight other schools in tow, this wasn’t supposed to happen. Columbia hadn’t won a relay at Penn since 1938, and hadn’t won the 4×8 since 1933. No Ivy League school had won at the relays since 1974.

But there I was, leading in front of 46,363 spectators at Philadelphia’s Franklin Field. It didn’t last long — 200 meters into the race, Prince Mumba of defending champion Oral Roberts, who had run more than three seconds faster than me in the 800, sprinted past me and into the lead. I hung as tight as I could, but by the final turn, I had slipped to third behind Mumba and Michigan’s Andrew Ellerton, who had finished second in the 800 at the NCAA Indoor Championships a month earlier.

“This is a great last 150 it’s gonna turn out to be,” Floreani said as we rounded the turn. “Ellerton and Prince Mumba, and Columbia is holding on there in third. This is a great run for Columbia.”

It seemed like that would be the last time Floreani would mention Columbia — and why would he as the two stars battled for victory? With 70 meters to go, Ellerton inched past Mumba, and entering the home straight, it seemed like that was it. Ellerton was poised to sprint away from Mumba for the win.

“Ellerton is on the shoulder of Prince and it looks like Ellerton”—then Floreani stopped. Just then, I moved to the outside and shifted gears, passing Mumba and pulling up on Ellerton’s right shoulder. With 60 meters to the finish line, I was even with Ellerton.

Floreani couldn’t contain the surprise in his voice as he interrupted himself: “But here comes Columbia.”

High School Cross Country Training: Are you running enough?

Cross Country Training


The discrepancy in high school cross country training is immense. I have coached individuals who maxed out at 30 miles per week in high school and others who exceeded 80 miles per week. There are so many different thoughts on mileage, staying healthy and avoiding burn-out.  The key is to find the optimal volume to ensure you reach your full potential as a runner. You need to identify the proper balance between enough and staying healthy – the edge. Approach it, but don’t cross over it.

I reached out to one of the top high school boy’s cross country coaches in the country, Coach Paul Vandersteen to take at closer look at the type of mileage the boys at Neuqua Valley High Schools are logging over the summer.

Freshman Boys: 35 – 40 miles per week

Sophomore Boys: 50 – 55 miles per week

Junior Boys: 60 – 65 miles per week

Senior Boys: 70  - 75 miles per week

*** However, their weekly mileage rarely exceeds 65 miles per week once school starts.

 

High school girls who want to follow this program’s volume philosophy should adjust accordingly:

Freshman Girls: 25 – 30 miles per week

Sophomore Girls: 35 – 40 miles per week

Junior Girls: 45 – 50 miles per week

Senior Girls: 50 - 55 miles per week

For more information about our personal coaching programs CLICK HERE

What To Do After The Last Cross Country Meet Of The Season

Cross Country Training

Cross Country Training

I have been asked numerous times over the past couple of weeks what to do in regard to training after the cross country season is over. Obviously, you will need some downtime to ensure you physically and mentally recover from the season. However, you need to balance this with not losing the fitness you acquired over the past several months. I used to give our runners two weeks completely off and then would spend the next six weeks ascending to full volume. Over the years, I learned that if we stayed active during the first couple of weeks after the xc season that our runners stayed healthier and maintained greater levels of fitness. It always seemed that our runners would start experiencing pains and/or developing injuries while we were in the middle of complete rest. It just never seemed to work effectively for us. So, I changed the phase name from Rest & Rejuvenation to Active Rest. I would prescribe a small shakeout run the day after the last meet and then have them take 2-3 days off. After that, our runners would run 30-35 every other day to finish out the week – the pace assigned during this period of time was embarrassingly slow. To transition out of light running every other day, we would run two days in a row – then rest one day, run three days – rest one and then start up again. Our first week after our Active Rest phase was typically 50% of their goal volume with two days of easy strides – around 10k pace-ish at the fastest.

Below is our first two weeks after the conclusion of XC

WEEK ONE

Monday           30 minutes easy

Tuesday          off

Wednesday     30 - 35 minutes easy

Thursday         off

Friday              30 - 35 minutes easy

Saturday          35 minutes easy

Sunday             off

WEEK TWO

Monday          35 minutes easy

Tuesday         30 minutes easy + 3 x 100m strides

Wednesday    35 minutes easy          

Thursday        off

Friday             35 minutes easy + 4 x 100m strides

Saturday         40 minutes easy

Sunday           35 minutes easy

Cross Country Training: How To Peak At Your State Meet?

Photo Credit -  http://www.dyestat.com

Photo Credit - http://www.dyestat.com

Cross Country Training

I have received several emails and texts recently asking me how to peak at the State Cross Country Championships. Because the State Meet is often the defining factor for your entire season, it is important that you have an understanding of what is required to ensure you are at your best in November.

As a college coach, my focus was always on the Conference Championships, Regionals, and the NCAA National Meet. I spent 25+ years trying to perfect the process.

Here a few suggestions that will give you the best chance to be at your best when it matters most.

1.     Maintain your Long Run throughout the season. Do not let this go. Prioritize it through the month of September and keep it in your training schemes through the month of August.

2.     Maintain your mileage. Don’t allow your mileage to drop too much or too often throughout the season. Constantly remind yourself that you are training for the State Meet. Meets in September and early October are ultimately meaningless and quickly forgotten if you don’t run well at States.  

3.     Keep longer intervals in your training deep into the season. Avoid the temptation of running all of your intervals at significantly faster paces over shorter distances. As the season progresses reduce the quality of your longer intervals and utilize them to maintain your strength.

4.     Choose your moments of being “jacked up” wisely. You only have so many times that you are able to dig deep into your emotional well. Don’t waste any of them in September. Don’t waste them on course records or hitting a certain time. Be business like in your approach until it is time to be jacked up!

5.     Similarly limit the times to dig deep into your physical well as well. You only have so many bone crushing, heroic performances in you. Never waste one in practice or at a “donkey” meet no one will ever remember. Choose your Herculean moments wisely.

6.     Realize that if you line up at your State Meet physically, emotionally and mentally ready to compete that you are worlds ahead of the majority of runners lining up next to you who have spent everything they have weeks ago and find themselves completely fried.

I hope this helps and good luck with the remainder of your season.

 Need help with your off-season winter training? Want to train like Kyle Merber, Johnny Gregorek, Ed Cheserick and numerous other NCAA All- Americans and Olympians? We offer personal coaching – CLICK HERE for more information.


What I Learned in Peru This Summer

College Track and Field Recruting

By Charlie Teeter - High School Runner

Training at altitude is unlike anything I’ve ever experienced. For the first two days in Peru, nobody ran. We just took this time to get used to the lack of air. At this point, I didn’t notice any difference in the air when I was doing daily activities. The next afternoon we went for our first run. Things felt weird. I did 4 miles at about 8-minute mile pace, but I was breathing as I normally would running 6:50s on my easy runs back home. As the trip went on, we began doing some pretty taxing service work throughout the community in Pisac. One day, I spent an entire morning carrying dirt, fertilizer, and roofing up a mountain to help a local farm relocate to a nearby school. I must have made fifteen to twenty trips up and down within a few hours. This was one of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done. We had about twenty people in our group helping out the three or four people who worked the farm. We saved them countless hours of work by coming to help, and it was clear how genuinely grateful they were (I also got an amazing workout out of this, so that never hurts). Our running gradually increased in intensity as well. At about two weeks in, I did an 11 mile run at 7:45 pace, and I was holding back a little bit to stick with the group (I would’ve liked to drop the last 3ish miles closer to 7:15 pace to push myself a little). I was really happy with this run, considering we had only been at altitude for a little over two weeks. 

There were sometimes when I worried about not getting good enough training. Every run we went on was pretty easy paced, and we only did one or two workouts while I was there. (EDITOR’S NOTE – See Flotrack workout video where CU Buffs legendary Head Cross Country Coach urges his men and women to keep the pace easy on a scheduled long run because the hills and altitude would provide the workout).  I was forgetting that just sleeping at 10,000ft is good training for your body. I was more worried going into our last week of the trip because we weren’t really going to have the chance to run at all during our four- day trek to Machu Picchu. I thought I was missing out on four days of training, but I couldn’t have been more wrong. Over the course of four days, we covered about 50 miles, reaching a high point of 15,300 feet above sea level. We climbed up and over multiple mountains, and my legs were absolutely destroyed from so much walking. (EDITOR’S NOTE – Most Elite Kenyan runners include long walks into their early training phases. It is not untypical for Kenyan runners to conduct three long walks of over 2 hours in duration into their early season conditioning programs).  I don’t think I’ll be having much trouble with hills this cross country season after this experience.

Traveling to get back home was tiring. I took a bus and four planes to get home over the course of about 22 hours. As one would expect, I was very tired when I finally got to my house. I had a good dinner with my family and got some energy back, so I decided to go for a little shake out run that night. This is when I noticed the effects of being at altitude. My legs didn't feel great, but my three-mile run felt easy at 6:35 pace. It’s incredible how much air there is closer to sea level. It was almost as if I was taking in something that I didn’t know was there. It just felt good to be going a little faster again.

This experience has taught me so much about myself, running, and life as a whole. Spending three weeks practicing another language, getting to know local market workers and their children, immersing myself in another culture, and making new lifelong friends is something I’ll be forever grateful for. I’m excited to use this knowledge to reach new heights on the cross country course this year. Thank you, Peru.

TO SIGN UP FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THE TRAINING ABROAD PROGRAMS CLICK HERE

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON KENYAN TRAINING CLICK HERE

CU BUFFS – WORKING HARD VIDEO CLICK HERE

 

How To Train Like A State Champion – An Inside Look at Dustin Horter’s Championship Season Training Schedule

Dustin Horter

How To Train For the Mile

Want to run fast at the end of the season?  Below you will find the final 13 days of Dustin Horter’s incredible high school running career. Four things to take away from Dustin’s running log:

1.     Stay with what got you there – remain consistent.

2.     Do not taper too much

3.     Don’t press - stay controlled and comfortable during quality work.

4.     Communicate with your coach about everything.

His Final Two Weeks:

Sunday – 9 miles @ 6:20 pace. Slower than usual but getting ready for States.

Monday – 6 miles @ 6:23 pace + 4 x 150m in 20-21. Smooth and relaxed run with coach.

Tuesday – 1.5 mile w/u jog – 8 x 400m in 65 w/ 60-90 seconds rest – 2.5 mile cool down. I felt really good and strong. I did not feel like I was pushing myself at all

 Wednesday – 6 miles @ 6:24 pace + 4 x 150m in 20-21. Slowly drawing back on intensity, but keeping mileage consistent. I felt very relaxed.

Thursday – 1.5 mile warm up +8 x 200m in 29 – 1.5 mile cool-down. I spiked up for this one. This workout was the easiest I have felt all week.

Friday4 miles at 6:49 pace at 7:00 am to get as much rest as possible before tomorrow + 4 x 150m in 20-21.

Saturday – Ohio State Meet – 4:06.96 (1st), 9:05.88 (3rd)

Sunday – 6 miles @ 6:21 pace. Staying consistent with what we have been doing to get ready for the national meet. Kept things pretty chill – no long run this week as my coach and I decided not to consider mileage this week at all. We decided to supplement harder workouts for missed mileage.

 Monday – 1.5 mile easy + 400m in 58, 2 x 300m in 44, 600m in 1:28 – 800m recovery jog – 4 x 200m in 26-27 – 1.5 mile cool down. Overall this was a great day for me and a confidence booster going into the weekend. I felt comfortable and controlled!

Tuesday – 6 miles @ 6:11 pace + 4 x 150m in 20-21. Pretty easy day. 

Wednesday – 1.5 mile warm-up -8 x 200m in 29 – 1.5 mile cool-down. This is basically my go to tune-up before big races (see above). Felt great, other than it being so hot out.  

Thursday – 4 miles @ 6:40 pace . Nice jog with some friends out in Seattle – a lot of talking and laughing. Followed run with 4 x 150m.

Friday – Brooks PR Invitational – 4:04.68 (1st) 

SEE VIDEO OF RACE HERE

How They Trained In College

Johnny Gregorek

2017 World Championship 1500m Finalist - USA

Fast Track Recruiting

Cross Country Prep - Sophomore Year

July 2011

Monday - 9 miles at 6:50 pace

Tuesday - 8 miles at 7:15 pace + 4 x 100m strides

Wednesday - 10 miles at 6:30 pace

Thursday - 8 miles @ 6:22 pace

Friday - 2.5 miles easy – 6 sets of 3 minutes on (xc pace) / 2 minutes easy + 2.5 miles easy

Saturday - 10 miles at 7:15 pace

Sunday - 14 miles at 6:15 pace

See other runners I coached here

Johnny Gregorek and NJNYTC

The History of the United States According to the Women's Steeplechase

Below is an excerpt from Liam Boylan-Pett's amazing historical look at the evolution of the steeplechase. It is this month's feature article in his newly created Lope Magazine - a magazine devoted entirely to providing eye-opening stories from the track. road and trail.  "This is the hurdle Emma Coburn has been waiting for—the final water jump of the 3,000-meter steeplechase at the 2017 World Track and Field Championships. She is in medal contention with less than two-hundred meters to go, but she is not focused on that right now, or the fact that fellow American Courtney Frerichs is also in position for a medal. Coburn is dead set on one thing: Nailing this final water jump."  "To understand how we ended up in this situation—how the United States, who had won only one global medal in the women’s steeplechase (not to mention, only eleven on the men’s side since 1900), had two runners leading the 2017 world championships with less than one-hundred-fifty meters to go—you have to go back to 1991, when American women finally had a chance to race for a national title in that odd, nearly two-mile event made for horses with immovable hurdles and water jumps."  Check out the archive section of Lope magazine to read more about  “We’ve got Kansas, Oral Roberts, Mississippi State, LSU, Michigan, Seton Hall, Georgetown, Villanova all in this mix. But it’s Columbia, in the light blue, leading.” -  perhaps my and Liam Boylan-Pett greatest sport's moment. -  https://lopemagazine.com/2018/05/14/columbia-penn-relays-4x800-upset-liam-boylan-pett/#about   To learn more about Liam Boylan-Pett and other former athletes I coached click here  - https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/athletes-i-have-coached/

Below is an excerpt from Liam Boylan-Pett's amazing historical look at the evolution of the steeplechase. It is this month's feature article in his newly created Lope Magazine - a magazine devoted entirely to providing eye-opening stories from the track. road and trail.

"This is the hurdle Emma Coburn has been waiting for—the final water jump of the 3,000-meter steeplechase at the 2017 World Track and Field Championships. She is in medal contention with less than two-hundred meters to go, but she is not focused on that right now, or the fact that fellow American Courtney Frerichs is also in position for a medal. Coburn is dead set on one thing: Nailing this final water jump."

"To understand how we ended up in this situation—how the United States, who had won only one global medal in the women’s steeplechase (not to mention, only eleven on the men’s side since 1900), had two runners leading the 2017 world championships with less than one-hundred-fifty meters to go—you have to go back to 1991, when American women finally had a chance to race for a national title in that odd, nearly two-mile event made for horses with immovable hurdles and water jumps."

Check out the archive section of Lope magazine to read more about “We’ve got Kansas, Oral Roberts, Mississippi State, LSU, Michigan, Seton Hall, Georgetown, Villanova all in this mix. But it’s Columbia, in the light blue, leading.” - perhaps my and Liam Boylan-Pett greatest sport's moment. - https://lopemagazine.com/2018/05/14/columbia-penn-relays-4x800-upset-liam-boylan-pett/#about

To learn more about Liam Boylan-Pett and other former athletes I coached click here - https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/athletes-i-have-coached/

Training with Olympic Gold Medalist William Tanui and Fast Track Recruiting

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 Want to train like an Olympic Gold Medalist from Kenya? If so, William Tanui has provided Fast Track Recruiting with unmatched access to the inside through an open discussion about how he trained. Below is a summary of the Kenyan training philosophy and practices following the conclusion of their outdoor season.  
 

NOTE: William Tanui was the 1992 Olympic Gold Medalist in the 800m and placed 5th in the 1500m at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games.  Tanui has PR’s of 1:43.30 in the 800m, 3:30.58 in the 1500m and 3:50.57 in the Mile.
 

Phase I – rest

You need to fully recover, both mentally physically, from your previous season. I suggest a complete shutdown. Use this time to ensure that you are completely recovered and fully prepared to resume training.

Editor's Note: Kenyan runners place a high premium on rest - "complete rest". It is imperative that you incorporate this phase into your summer training as it is equally as important. In the US system, we are often extremely impatient and rush back to training and quality running way too quickly. 

Phase II – General Preparation - During this phase, your focus should be on leisurely low-end aerobic work. I suggest focusing on very easy running and cross training during this phase – swimming, biking and strength training. Everything should be performed at a low intensity. In the prime of my career, I would perform five two-hour sessions per week. I would advise that you start with a much lower goal duration.                                                                                                                                                                    

Editor's Note - The Kenyans use this time to develop a massive aerobic base with low-intensity work. Many of the top collegiate programs loosely adhere to this same philosophy as most good programs avoid quality work as they ascend to full volume. 

Phase III – Early Season

During this phase, we start to increase the intensity. At this point, you should start doubling when appropriate. You should focus on high-end aerobic work during this phase through progression runs, runs at a steady pace and hilly runs ( Editor's Note - read Run With The Buffaloes or research old-school Arkansas training).  This is a great time to focus on hill repeats to strengthen your quads. We also perform two days of strength work a week to strengthen our arms for the push to the finish line.

Phase IV – Late Season

This phase will be the most intense period of your training. We do traditional interval work two days a week, if not racing. We do a great deal of ladder work, often including short speed reps toward the end of the session. We also did a fartlek session once a week in a wide open field where the focus was on very fast running.

Look for future articles from William Tanui about coaching, international recruiting and other subjects related to running and track and field.

See how 2017 World Championship 1500m FInalist, Johnny Gregorek trained over the summer while in college here: https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/training-blog/2018/1/18/how-they-trained-in-college

 

Want To Run Sub 4? Tips for Running A PR In The Mile

TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING

By: Willy Wood

 

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28 college runners have run sub 4 indoors this year alone. Of the 28 runners who have broken 4 minutes in the mile, 21 of them have different coaches. Obviously, there are many ways to the top of the mountain. However, most training programs share more similarities than differences. A few notable commonalities include:

Routine easy runs of 50 - 70 minutes at a comfortable pace.

Morning Tempo runs ranging between 4-6 miles coupled with an afternoon hill or speed session am 5 mile controlled tempo run (around 5:00 pace for sub 4 miler) pm 8 x 150m Hill Sprints

Strength work through sub-maximal, controlled intervals of 800m - Mile 8 - 10 x 1000m with 2-minute recovery jog (2:50 - 3:00 for a sub 4 miler)

High-quality race pace and sub-race pace intervals. 1 x 800m in 1:52 with 8-minute recovery followed by 6 x 200m in 27 with 2-minute recovery or 4 x ( 2 x 400m with 1-minute rest) 3 minutes rest - set 1 in 62, set 2 in 60, set 3 in 59, set 4 in 58

Long run of 14 - 16 miles

"Hey, Coach - Any Tips for Breaking 2:00 in the 800m"

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING

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I was recently asked by a sixteen-year-old high school runner who is stuck at 2:01 in the 800m. His goal for this season is to break 2:00! He wrote me asking for a few tips. I have three suggestions for you if you want to PR in the 800m or break 2:00!

TIP ONE - Run hills. Hill training will significantly increase your finishing speed/strength over the last 150m of the race. My favorite hill workout is to run 8 - 10 x 150m hills with a jog down recovery. The goal of this part of the workout is to conclude finish as quickly as possible - so you'll have to hammer the downhill as well. Take 5 minutes or so to recover and then find a 600m hill to sprint up with all you have left.

TIP TWO - Incorporate Lane 8 Tempo's into your training. This is a far more fitting manner to get in tempo/threshold work for an 800m runner as it breaks the run up into 400m segments and allows the 800m runner to perform this at a faster pace than if you had them do a standard 3 - 4 mile tempo run.

TIP THREE - My favorite sharpening workout is 600m- 400m- 200m- 200m. The goal is to rest as little as possible. During this workout, we just get after it. The 600m should be around goal pace or slightly faster. The 400m should be at the same pace (this will be very difficult to accomplish). The 200m's should be a pace slightly faster than the 400m. Although the stated goal is minimal rest - you don't want the quality to suffer! You may have to rest 10 - 12 minutes after the 600m.

For more 800m training suggestions see here- https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/athletic-recruiting-blog/2017/11/28/college-track-and-field-training-december-800m-training

To see the the effectiveness of this training methodology see here - https://www.fasttrackrecruiting.com/athletes-i-have-coached/

Tips For Winter Running - Radix Running Camps

TRACK AND FIELD TRAINING

https://radixrunning.com

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By, Mike Mazzaccaro

After several teeth chattering runs, bone-chilling, pink-cheeked runs, I decided to write down some of the best tips and tricks for winter running that I’ve learned and heard over the years.

Make it Fun!

Run with your friends. Nothing makes a 50-minute run, in freezing weather, better than having some friends to push through the misery with you.

Find new places to run. The winter is a great time to go exploring. Often, your go-to runs are too snowy or icy to be used. This makes the winter a great time to find some fun road loops that can provide new but reliable training

Pick a fun place to finish. Find a loop that finishes at your favorite coffee shop. Instead of finishing and having to hop into a cold car you can settle down with a hot chocolate or warm cup of coffee before the ride home.

Stay Warm

Layer, Layer, Layer. Layers are the key to running in the cold. For a long time, I only ran in cotton long sleeves in the winter. This often meant I was cold at the start, sweating in the middle, and frozen wet by the end. Be smart and pick a bottom layer that wicks away moisture.

Know thy self. My college roommate could run in 25F weather with a long sleeve, shorts, and a baseball cap. Personally, my hands and ears go numb at any temperature below 40F. As a result, I always have a spare hat and gloves (socks) laying around. It’s important to know what YOU need to make sure you’re worried about the effort of your run not if your ears are going to fall off.

Keep Hydrated

Hydration is key in the summer. Hydration is key in the winter. Hydration is key all the time. Make sure you are drinking enough water throughout the day. We tend to worry about our water consumption less in the winter as its much colder out and we tend to sweat less but, because of this we drink less water and are often dehydrated.

Watch for Injuries

Often, as a result of the winter weather, people change where they run. If there has been snow on the ground for 3 weeks forcing you to run on roads for the same amount of time be aware of this. The roads are a lot harder on your body than grassy trails. As a result, maybe pair back your mileage and replace some of that mileage with cross training such as biking or swimming.

The cold also means you have to warm up longer! Whether this means starting off runs a little slower or changing your warm-up from 5 to 10 minutes make sure your muscles and tendons are ready to go before you put them to work in cold weather.

Know the Elements

Be creative.When it’s windy and cold out, sometimes splits and times go out the window so it’s important to focus on effort as the temperature drops. Maybe substitute some fartleks in for timed intervals

Start into the wind. Maybe I’m alone on this but I much prefer the first 20 minutes of my run into the wind than the final 20.

If you have any good tips or tricks for winter running let us know in the comment section

Coach Mazz

How They Trained in College

College Track and Field Training

Summer Training

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See below a sample week of how 2017 World Championship 1500m Finalist, Johnny Gregorek trained while in college. Johnny came from a low mileage high school program and we slowly increased his mileage over his four years at Columbia. Here is a sample week of his summer training, prior to the start of his sophomore year.

Monday - 9 miles at 6:50 pace

Tuesday - 8 miles at 7:15 pace + 4 x 100m strides

Wednesday - 10 miles at 6:30 pace

Thursday - 8 miles @ 6:22 pace

Friday - 2.5 miles easy – 6 sets of 3 minutes on (xc pace) / 2 minutes easy + 2.5 miles easy

Saturday - 10 miles at 7:15 pace

Sunday - 14 miles at 6:15 pace

Train Like A Sub 1:50 800m Runner

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Here is a look at how we trained our 800m runners at this time of the year. Our training was often influenced by the weather. As a result, we were not able to run hill intervals as much as I would have liked - so we pushed that phase back to March and April. Here is a sample week from January. As you will notice, we followed Gags' (https://www.njnytc.com/frank-gagliano/) philosophy of mixing speed and strength. We never ventured far from either.

Monday - 50 minutes easy

Tuesday - 6 x 800m in 2:20 w/ 2’ rest

Wednesday - 50 minutes easy

Thursday - 2 (200m, 400m, 200m, 200m in 26, 55, 28, 28) full recovery between sets

Friday - 50 minutes easy

Saturday - 2 x 2 mile @ 5:30 pace w/ 5 minute recovery

Sunday - 1:20 easy